Basketball Manitoba and its member associations will use the following standards to determine if any outdoor basketball games or practices are to be postponed or modified.  All data used will be sourced by Environment Canada at the time of the basketball activity.  


Temperature / Humidex / 

UV Rating

Heavy Rain

Thunder / Lightning

Air Quality

Wind

Humidex (aka ‘Feels Like’) of 40-45 C and / or UV ratings of 8+, participants cautioned to limit strenuous activities and maximize water intake and seek shade to avoid sunstroke and other heat related issues. 


A humidex of 

46+ C will result in all outdoor games and practices postoned

Games and practices will be postponed when the basketball court becomes wet and slippery puddles begin forming.

30/30 RULE. When you see lightning, count the time until you hear thunder. If this time is thirty (30) seconds or less, all outdoor games and practice will be postponed and participants are to seek proper shelter. 


Wait thirty (30) minutes or more after hearing the last thunder before leaving the shelter. If you cannot see the lightning, just hearing the thunder is a good back up rule. 

Air quality of a 7-10 ‘High Risk’ range as determined by Environment Canada will see all outdoor games and practices postponed.

Winds gusts in excess of 75 km/h will see all outdoor games and practices postponed.  

Humidex, Heat & UV Index

  • Humidex Policy

    • Humidex of 20-29 no discomfort. Humidex of 30-39 some discomfort. Humidex of 40-45 great discomfort. Humidex of 46 and over, dangerous. 

    • Humidex of 20-29 no discomfort.

    • Humidex of 30-39 some discomfort.

    • Humidex of 35 - 39 (some discomfort), games will proceed as scheduled. A water break during each quarter may be allowed if agreed upon by the teams.

    • Humidex of 40-45 great discomfort; avoid exertion. Basketball Manitoba or its member association recommends delaying tip off, postponing or cancelling the game/practice

      • Should a member League or Association decide to go ahead with its scheduled matches, multiple water breaks will be permitted during the course of each half of play. 

      • Should the humidex reading be greater than 40 at the scheduled game/practice time, teams are encouraged to postpone the start of the game until the humidex reading has dropped below 40 to minimize the risk of heat stroke. If this is not expected to happen in a reasonable amount of time such that the game can be completed that evening, proceed with extreme caution and consider alternative measures to protect the players.

    • Humidex of 46 and over, dangerous; possible heat stroke; avoid exertion. If value of 46 and over, Basketball Manitoba or its member association recommends to cancel matches


  • Heat Policy

    • How can you tell if one of your basketball players is experiencing heat injury? Below is a list of the early warning signs to look for and again this is not an exhaustive list:

      • Flushed face

      • Hyperventilation or shortness of breath

      • Headache

      • Dizziness

      • Tingling arms

      • Goosebumps (hair on arms standing on end)

      • Chilliness

      • Poor coordination

      • Confusion, agitation, uncooperativeness

      1. Heat Cramps - These are the mildest form of heat trauma and are commonly related to low body sodium and chloride levels.

  • Signs & Symptoms include - weakness, muscle cramps, collapse with low blood pressure.

  • Treatment - is aimed at replacing the salt loss and can be oral or by intravenous if vomiting is a problem. Having athletes put a little extra salt on their food the day before and day of game can be a helpful way to avoid this condition. Provide water/electrolyte beverages.

     2. Heat Exhaustion - This is a more severe medical event.

  • Signs & Symptoms include - weakness, irritability, collapse, unable to sweat adequately to promote body cooling, my proceed in the more ominous heat stroke and a fine rash is often present.

  • Treatment - remove athlete(s) to a cooler environment (indoors or in the shade), use ice baths, fans, and provide water/electrolyte beverages.

     3. Heat Stroke - THIS IS A MEDICAL EMERGENCY - it is due to a failure of the heat-controlling mechanism. It may occur merely as a result of exposure to heat.

  • Signs & Symptoms include - mental confusion, headache, poor coordination, delirium, convulsions and death. The body temperature may be 40.5 C or 106 F or higher, the skin is usually hot and dry as the sweating mechanism has failed.

  • Treatment - Call 911 and transport to a local Hospital. Rapid cooling is the goal using wet towels, spray mist, sponge baths and removal from the heat. This condition could cause the athlete to go into shock and coma may follow so immediate medical attention is required.

  • Heat Prevention and Safety

    • Avoid dehydration and make sure you pre-hydrate: Don’t wait till you feel thirsty because the body will not be able to tell you in time that you are already dehydrated, here are some practical recommendations:

    • 2 hours before exercise, drink at least 16 oz or 500 ml (an average bottle of water).

    • 1 hour before exercise, drink at least 08 oz or 250 ml (half an average bottle of water.

    • During the exercise, drink at least 4 to 8 oz (quarter to half a water bottle) every 15 - 20 minutes.

    • Immediately after the exercise, drink at least 16 oz or 500 ml (an average bottle of water) of water or an electrolyte replacing drink.

    • 1 hour after a training session or game consider drinking 16 oz or 500 ml of skim milk or chocolate milk for protein and muscle repair.

    • As a rule of thumb you should drink at least 500 ml for every 9 kg (20lbs) of body weight, therefore, someone weighing 140 lbs needs to drink at least 3500 ml (7 water bottles) of fluid per day if training or playing that day.

    • Drinking carbohydrate and electrolyte fluids may be beneficial in avoiding heat trauma.

    • Wearing light breathable clothing is advised.

UV Index Policy 

  • UV Index: 1-2 Low Risk. 3-4 Medium Risk. 5-6 High Risk. 7-10 Very High Risk. 

  • Low Risk (1-2) means that there is nothing to worry about - the sun will not harm you. Redness (erythema) will appear in 2 hours or more. 

  • Medium Risk (3-4) means that the sun is not dangerous, but you should avoid being in direct sunlight for more than 1 to 2 hours. Redness (erythema) will appear after longer exposition. Burners should apply skin protection factor (SPF) 15 sunscreen. All people should wear UV-A+B sunglasses

  • High Risk (5-6) means you could burn in 30 to 60 minutes. Try to keep out of direct sunlight, cover up or wear a sunscreen lotion SPF 15+. Use protective clothing.

  • Very High Risk (7-10) means that you could burn severely in 20 to 30 minutes. Stay out of direct sunlight, cover up and use a sunscreen lotion SPF 15+.

    • People of all skin colours, especially children and babies, can suffer eye damage, overheating and dehydration as a result of excessive sun exposure.

Heavy Rain 

  • Heavy Rain Policy

  • Play or practice will be postponed when the basketball court becomes wet and unplayable.

Thunder and Lightning

  • Thunder and Lightning Policy 

  • 30/30 RULE. When you see lightning, count the time until you hear thunder. If this time is thirty (30) seconds or less, seek proper shelter. Wait thirty (30) minutes or more after hearing the last thunder before leaving the shelter. If you cannot see the lightning, just hearing the thunder is a good back up rule. 

  • If there is no improvement in the weather after the initial 30 minutes then the game will be called to stop. Note: Lightning may strike several kilometres away from the parent cloud and precautions should be taken even if the thunderstorm is not directly overhead.

  • The existence of blue sky and absence of rain are not protection from lightning.

  • Lightning can and does strike as far as 10 miles (16km) away from the rain shaft. 

  • It does not have to be raining for lightning to strike. Lightning awareness should be increased with the first flash of lightning or the first clap of thunder, no matter how far away. This activity must be treated as a wake-up call to all. 

  • The most important aspect to monitor is how far away the lightning is occurring, and how fast the storm is approaching, relative to the distance of a safe shelter. When larger groups are involved, the time needed to properly evacuate an area increases. As time requirements change, the distance at which lightning is noted and considered a threat to move into the area must be increased.

  • If you can hear thunder, you can get hit by lightning. Immediately take shelter. A fully enclosed building with wiring and plumbing is the safest shelter, but a metal roofed vehicle is also a safe place to be. STAY AWAY from tall objects such as basketball hoops, trees, poles, and metal fences. 

  • Prevention and Safety

    • If you are in a group in the open, spread out, keeping people several metres apart.

    • If caught in a field far from shelter and you feel your hair stand on end, lightning may be about to hit you. Crouch on the ground immediately, with feet together, placing your hands on your knees and bending forward. Do not lay flat.

Air Quality

  • Air Quality Policy

  • Air Quality: 1-3 Normal. 4-6 Moderate Risk. 7-10 High Risk. 10 or above Very High Risk.

    • 1-3 - Normal -Continue playing as normal

    • 4-6 - Moderate Risk - No need to modify your usual outdoor activity unless coughing or throat irritation. 

    • 7-10 - High Risk- Basketball Manitoba or its member association will reschedule the game or practice to a different date or find alternative indoor facilities to play.

    • 10+ - Very High Risk- Reduce or reschedule strenuous activities especially if you experience coughing and throat irritation; children and elderly should avoid strenuous activities.

Wind

Strong Winds Policy

  • Strong winds can reach over 100 km per hour causing damage to large areas with flying debris, which can cause injuries. These winds are often mistaken for tornados. 

  • Strong Winds Prevention and Safety

  • Take cover due to flying debris and do not place yourself under trees as large branches may fall. Get inside a solid building. If outside is the only option, find a low area such as a ditch and lay down protecting your head.

Tornado Policy

  • Occasionally, tornadoes can be strong and cause injury or death. The city areas are as much at risk as the rural areas. 

  • Tornado Prevention and Safety

  • Most of the injuries are caused by flying debris. Take cover inside a solid building on the lowest floor or basement, under the stairs or a strong table away from windows and protect your head with cushions. Don’t take cover in large gymnasiums or arenas as large roofs may collapse – bathrooms and hallways are better. If outside is the only option, find a low area such as a ditch and lay down protecting your head.



PSO Board of Directors Approval Date:

Monday, November 28, 2022



Subscribe to Email Newsletter
Share this article to...