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10 Steps to Improve Your Coaching

http://ift.tt/1tpmk41

Article Source: http://ift.tt/1tpmk47


By: Mike Dunlap


http://ift.tt/1tpmk41The richness of coaching rests within the seemingly insurmountable frustration of watching as a player finds his way. The teachable moments are those that are frequently fraught with poor decisions. Yet that is exactly when an individual needs his coach. Those moments are priceless and a turning point for the athlete. Wonder not why you do what you do and KNOW that you make a difference!!!


The evolution of a master teacher takes years of skill development. The outstanding coach is an exceptional teacher. We believe that there are fundamental steps that should be considered when teaching your team:



1) Know the five laws of learning



  • Explain what you want

  • Demonstrate for the learner

  • Player demonstrates

  • Correct demonstration

  • Repetition is lord and master


2) Know how players learn



  • Visual

  • Auditory

  • Kinetic

  • Writing/Drawing

  • Player as coach

  • Cooperative versus competitive technique

  • Whole, part, whole versus part whole method

  • Feedback system – negative versus positive


3) Teaching techniques



  • Universal teaching technique (i.e. find the problem and fix it)

  • Praise, prompt, and leave (i.e. find positive, correction, and next step, leave)

  • Relay teach – the cooperative method

  • Create your own language (e.g. anachronisms)

  • Use your voice as a tool

  • Speak in word pictures, analogies, and metaphors

  • Overload to get conditioned response (i.e. consistently give the student the advantage when they are demonstrating as early success breeds confidence)

  • Progression – teach in sequence and then reverse it (i.e. inductive & deductive)


4) Use the four steps of shaping



  • Set the stage

  • Modeling

  • Prompt

  • Forms of feedback (i.e. ask questions, make observations, reinforce the correct response)


5) Talk less, do more



  • We need to reduce out verbal instruction


6) Recognize the power of observation, listening, and gathering information



  • Behavior patterns

  • Myers/ Briggs psychological exam, self-aggression evaluation, and the “I am sheet”


7) Role declaration is paramount to a coaches’ success


8) Know your audience, circumstance, and be ready to adapt or change course


9) Competition means time, score, and personal records (e.g. individual/group)


10) Apologize



  • We will make mistakes. We humanize ourselves when we go public and our players will accept us more readily.


We are teachers. We are trying to create an environment of learning. Hence, mistakes must be encouraged as a form of discovery. Certainly, we want to correct the problem and move on in a timely fashion. The more teaching skills we have at our disposal – the better. If we are comfortable with our style, the player will adjust quickly. Effective communication is the instructor’s greatest tool. Learning is a step-by-step process. We keep it simple, as we know that the player responds best to precise instruction.


We believe that the coach should work off a blueprint of conceptual teaching. This means teaching cognitive ideas through a specific process (i.e. drills that are directly linked to the whole). Our shooting drills come directly from our offense and they may change from one season to the next, yet the ingredients of competition and effort level are never compromised.


The what, where, how, when, and why are always foremost in our minds when explaining our philosophy. The “when” and “why” are the most important to us. We want thinking players who can react quickly under pressure. Hence, we create that environment in our practices with consequences for actions.


We teach winning basketball. We are not interested in just playing. The enjoyment for the player comes from learning, interaction with others, and measurable improvement. We teach that perfection comes from an all-out effort.


The standards for winning must be defined. The coach should have measurements both offensively and defensively that represent a system. When pressure is applied confusion will reign unless there is structure. Moreover, that is when communication breaks down. We cannot have this. We see the first signs of a successful culture when the players start saying and teaching “Our Way” when times are tough. We like that.


In conclusion, we can only do one thing at a time. Simplicity is our guide. We constantly evaluate our system under the most severe circumstances. Teaching techniques define our system.




Filed under: Coaching, Correcting Form, Fundamentals, Leadership, Miscellaneous, Motivation Tagged: coaching, Correcting Form, ethical coaching, fundamentals, Learning, Motor skill, patience, practice planning, tips, youth basketball



Source: Steve Nash Youth Basketball Blog http://ift.tt/1pUSgwH

The Consequence of Choice in Basketball

By: Don Kelbick

As coaches, we try to prepare our players for every possible situation they might face in a game. When we teach skills, we try to present things that that will help our players to excel in every area. In our desire to create a formidable basketball entity (team or player), we don’t realize how complex we make the game for players.


Taken individually, what we teach is not complex. However, once we start adding plays, options, contingencies, reads, film sessions, adjustments, etc., we take a simple task and make it extremely complex. We needlessly add to their cognitive load. We fail to consider the “Consequence of Choice.”

There is a psychological phenomenon called the “Consequence of Choice.” It says that the more choices you are faced with, the more difficult it is to decide. When you finally decide, it has taken longer and you are less confident that is was the correct choice.

Consequence of choice is evidenced all around us. I am in the market for a new bed. I want to choose between a traditional innerspring mattress and a pillow top. I went to the mattress store and they had 40 models of each. I was overwhelmed and decided not to buy anything. When restaurants calling in consultants to help their businesses, invariably the first thing that is recommended is to limit the menu, limit choices.

Here’s an experiment. The next time you are with you team or a group of friends, or even better, your family, and you want to decide on an activity, ask, “What would you like to do today?” See how much discussion is generated, how many questions and answers come up and how long it takes to make a decision. The next time, instead of asking just say, “Let’s get pizza.” See what happens then. You might be surprised.

How does that translate to basketball?

As we prepare out players, we lay out option after option. We give them choices. Then, we tell them to read the opponents. As they are trying to figure it out, we jump on them for not acting or taking too long with the ball. All the while, players are going through all the flip cards in their mind to see what you have taught them is appropriate for that situation. In truth, they are acting but we can’t see them. They develop “analysis paralysis” because we have given them too many options. That is a consequence of choice.

Am I saying not to prepare them or teach your player? No. I am saying, instead of giving them choices, give them a map to follow. What does that mean?

To give it some relevance, let’s look in the post. Two of the best post coaches I have ever been exposed to are the late, great Rick Majares and NBA veteran Bill Cartwright. While other coaches are teaching “Read you defense” upon receiving the ball in the post (and then probably jumping on them for holding the ball), they are teaching their players to act. Each has a definitive reason for teaching what they do, but we won’t go into that here. Upon receiving the ball, Majares taught, “immediately look baseline.” Left handed, right handed, right side, left side it didn’t matter, look baseline. If the baseline is guarded, go middle.

Cartwright teaches, “Attack the middle.” Left handed, right handed, right side, left side it didn’t matter, attack middle. If the middle is guarded, go baseline.

Even though they are different, they are the same. They give their players a plan of action and a map to follow. They consciously reduce their players cognitive load. Obviously, they go much more in depth, but the thinking is the same. They do not lay out “Consider this, this and this and then choose.” They teach act, if it does not work out, look next. If you examine post players who have been taught by these two you will find some of the most effective post players on their levels. They actually expand their players’ games by limiting choices. The result is a quicker, more definitive and effective decision-making process.

I have found that a significant limiter of player effectiveness is not that they don’t know what to do, but they have too much to choose from. I have had great success in improving players by trying to lessen the “Consequence of Choice.” In my triple threat of “Shot, Shot, Shot,” players really only have one decision to make; not to shoot. If they make that decision, I give them a map of where to go next. But, the initial decision is to act.

It might be counter intuitive to say that you can expand a players options but limiting their choices, but in actuality, that’s what happens. Indecision is a player killer. By limiting the “Consequence of Choice,” players become more aggressive, more decisive and better players.

Source: http://stevenashyb.wordpress.com/2014/07/30/consequence-of-choice/

Community Sport Coach Training Workshop to be held at Brandon University

Basketball Manitoba will be hosting a Community Sport Coach Training workshop on Saturday August 30 at Brandon University's Healthy Living Centre. The workshop will be open to anyone who may coach kids the sport of basketball. The program is ideal for beginner and community coaches including parents and teachers.


"This is a great opportunity for anyone that may be interested in coaching basketball at any level, but in particular coaches that are relatively new to the sport," says Bobcats women's basketball coach Novell Thomas.

The workshop will be comprised of sessions both in the classroom as well as the Henry Champ Gymnasium.

The session will run from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm.

Registration in advance is preferred, but participants may register the day of the event.

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Cost for each participant is $85 + GST.

Lunch will not be provided, but a lunch break will be taken mid-way, as well as intermittent breaks through-out the day.

As well as the workshop, coach Thomas and men's coach Gil Cheung will be recieving additional training to become Learning Facilitators for the Sport Coach Training Level providing them the ability to certify students who complete the Basketball I course as part of the Bachelor of Physical Education Studies program at BU.

BOYS CAMPS ALMOST SOLD OUT: Basketball Manitoba High PerformanceBasketball Camps for Ages 10-15 Set for August



CAMPS ALMOST SOLD OUT! Welcome to the Basketball Manitoba High Performance Camps!  The Basketball Manitoba High Performance Camps are for experienced players from ages 10 to 15 years old. The camp has an emphasis on improving the athlete’s fundamental skills and understanding of the game. The camp provides a 7 to 1 player to coach ratio and is taught by some of Manitoba best coaches and players.


CAMP DATES, TIMES & AGES (Ages as of first date of the camp)

  1. August 18-22, 9:00 am -12:00 pm - Ages 10-12 Girls 
  2. August 18-22, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm - Ages 13-15 Girls 
  3. August 25-29, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm, Ages 10-12 Boys
  4. SOLD OUT - August 25-29, 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm, Ages 13-15 Boys - SOLD OUT

CAMP COST (Fee includes GST) 

  • $150.00 per person
  • Payment Options
    • Online: Visa, MasterCard, PayPal
    • Basketball Manitoba Office: Interac, Visa, MasterCard, Cash, Cheque or Money Order
    • By Mail: Cheque or Money Order (payable to 'Basketball Manitoba'); Basketball Manitoba, 145 Pacific Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2Z6


REGISTRATION DEADLINES
  • FEMALE - Friday August 15, 2014 at 5:00 pm - or when the camp sells out
  • MALE - Friday August 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm - or when the camp sells out

GIRLS CAMP INSTRUCTORS (Read full bios below)

  • Randy Kusano (head)
  • Alyssa Grant
  • Samantha Pyke
  • Stephanie Gill

BOYS CAMP INSTRUCTORS (Read full bios below) 

  • Dan Becker (head)
  • Herve Vincent
  • Stephen Tackie
  • Jon Giesbrecht

CAMP OVERVIEW & NOTES
  • Players are to attend ALL days of the camp (15 hours of court time in all)
  • Players are asked to show up 20 minutes prior to the first session to register.
  • Players are asked to come dressed ready to participate including non-marking runners, shorts (no pockets) and a t-shirt. It is also suggested players bring a water bottle and a towel.
  • Every camp participant will receive a Basketball Manitoba T-shirt.
  • All registered participants are covered under Basketball Manitoba’s Insurance Program

CAMP LOCATION 


All camp sessions will be held at Balmoral Hall School, 630 Westminister Ave. Winnipeg, MB


 


 


Camp full?  Sign up for our HP Camp Waiting List


CAMP CONTACT 



For more information on the Basketball Manitoba High Performance Camp Series, please contact...
  • Dan Becker for camp content and general questions

COACH BIOGRAPHIES 


Dan Becker has been an active player and coach for over 30 years at all levels of the basketball.  As a coach, Dan has worked with players at many different levels.  He has assisted at the CIS men's level from 2000 to 2004 and then assumed the interim head coaching duties during the 2004-05 with the University of Manitoba Men's Program. Over this same time period, Dan coached a number of Basketball Manitoba's Provincial Teams at the 15U and 17U levels, winning a bronze medal at the 2004 Juvenile Championships, and culminating with the Canada Games team in 2005. In 2004, Dan was an active coach in the Canada Basketball Centre for Performance Program and an instructor at the Nike All-Canada Camp.

From 2005 to 2010 Dan coached with Randy Kusano and the Oak Park Raiders Varsity Boy's Program winning two Provincial Championships and making five consecutive Final Four appearances. Dan has also coached the University of Winnipeg Collegiate Varsity Boys, Linden Meadows Grade 8 girls, and various WMBA teams.

As a player, Dan played his high school basketball at Fort Richmond Collegiate and then went on to play NCAA Division 1 basketball at the University of Colorado. After graduation, Dan continued his basketball career playing 12 years for a variety of teams and leagues all over the globe playing in Spain, Israel, Portugal, Germany, Australia, Mexico, Finland, and Luxembourg.  Dan also played in the USLB, CBA, GBL, WBL, NBL, and the IBL...including stints with the Winnipeg Thunder and the Winnipeg Cyclone.

In the summer of 1991, Dan was invited to try-out for the Denver Nuggets and Indiana Pacers of the NBA.  Dan's playing career also saw him represent Team Canada in the late 80's early 90's on various Student and Training National Teams including the World University Games in Germany and 2 Jones Cups in Taipei, Taiwan.

Currently, Dan is the Head Coach of the Basketball Canada Centre for Performance Male Program for the Manitoba region and the High Performance Coach for Basketball Manitoba.  Dan is also a Learning Facilitator in the new NCCP coaching education program.   He completed his NCCP Level 4 education at the National Coaching Institute in Winnipeg.  Dan is also trained in the new NCCP coursework at the Train To Compete, Train To Train, Learn To Train stages.

__________________________________________________________

Randy Kusano was the winningest coach in the history of high school basketball in Manitoba. His high school teams won three MHSAA (Manitoba High School Athletic Association) AAAA Provincial Championships provincial titles, 11 conference titles and he coached in 15 AAAA Final Fours in his 34 years coaching with the Oak Park Raiders in Winnipeg before retiring from teaching in 2010. A University of Manitoba graduate, Kusano is a current fully certified NCCP Level 3 coach with nearly 25 years of CIS coaching experience as an assistant with the Bison men’s and women's basketball program.

Randy has been involved in basketball as a player and coach for over forty years. He developed his love for basketball at Norberry Junior High in St. Vital playing for Hall of Famer, Dennis Alvestad. He moved on to Glenlawn Collegiate and finally to the University of Manitoba.  Randy was a member of three consecutive Canadian Junior Men’s championship teams from 1971-1973. In 1976 he was a member of the first Manitoba team to win a National University championship in basketball, the University of Manitoba Bisons.

After his university years were done he continued playing with the Nicolett Inn Senior men’s team that captured their first National Senior Men’s Championship in 1979. The University of Manitoba Junior Men and Nicolett Inn Senior men’s teams were later inducted into the Manitoba Basketball Hall of Fame.

Randy’s coaching career began with the University of Manitoba Junior Bisons in 1974 and continued there until 1976. He has coached high school basketball for the past thirty-four years, thirty two as head coach of the Varsity Boys program at Oak Park High School.

Over his 34 years at Oak Park, Randy developed the dominate high school program of it’s era, going to 15 Final Fours and winning 3 AAAA Provincial Championships. During this time he has helped to develop more than twenty five players who have gone on to play at the Canadian College or CIS level. Randy has also served as an assistant coach at the University of Manitoba for fifteen years.

Randy has also coached numerous Manitoba Provincial teams as head coach and as an assistant coach at the Canada Games, Western Canada Games, and National Championships.

__________________________________________________________

Stephen-Tackie.jpg
Stephen Tackie has been involved with the Manitoba Provincial Team program both as a head and an assistant coach at a variety of levels since 1998. In 2005, he began working as an assistant with the Wesmen Men's basketball program and has been ever since. He has coached in Manitoba's male Centre for Performance Program for 4 years and recently become an Instructor for Canada basketball's Intro to Competition Advanced coaches certification course.


Steve is very active in the summer basketball camp circuit with involvement with the Wesmen Camps, Peace Gardens, Athletes in Action, Rocky Mountain in Alberta and the Boston Celtics summer camp in Boston, Mass. Most recently Coach Tackie has been part of the Point Guard College (PGC) organization, instructing at camps in Atlanta, Texas (2008) and UCLA (2009).

In 2012 and 2013, Coach Tackie led Manitoba to two consecutive Silver Medal finishes at the Canada Basketball National Championships at the 17U Male level.  

In 2008 and 2009 Tackie was voted back to back Junior Varsity boy's coach of the year, and in 2010 was a finalist for the Sports Manitoba Coach of the year award. Currently he is the head coach of the Varsity Boys program at Sturgeon Heights Collegiate, where he also has been a teacher since 2002.


Tackie has lead Sturgeon Heights to the AAAA Final Four Provincial Championship 5 out of the last 6 years (JV and Varsity) including a Junior Varsity boy's provincial Championship in 2009. 

__________________________________________________________

herve-vincent.jpgHerve Vincent was born and raised in France where his dedication to the game began in 1988 when he joined a basketball club. He has been involved in coaching since 1997 where he started as a volunteer and became a certified coach in 2005. He earned his degrees in sociology, education and sports training.  He has coached and trained players at all levels, from youth to adult, at both the city and national level for 15 years. He has experience in promoting basketball via presentations in schools, community centers, university, tournaments and skill camps.

From 2006 to 2009, Vincent worked as a technical supervisor for the youth basketball development program in the SPO Rouen professional club, where he developed and implemented specific youth skills programs.He also developed the grassroots program "school of basketball" multiplying the number of players by 3 in 3 years in the club. He was nominated head coach for the best grade 6-7 player's selection at the provincial level in 2008 and 2009.

In 2009, Vincent moved to Canada to experience the sports culture in North America. He joined the Junior Bisons program and started his work with Basketball Manitoba's Centre for Performance and Todd MacCulloch Hoop School programs. He also became assistant coach at Kelvin High school at the Junior varsity level in 2009 and with the varsity team in 2011.
Vincent is currently coaching in the Manitoba Centre for Performance Program, an assistant coach with the University of Manitoba Bisons men's team and is coaching for the Junior Bison club. He started his certification in Canada, and has travelled in 10 countries where he has played basketball in every visited city. 

__________________________________________________________

Jon Giesbrecht has been coaching basketball since 2008.  Most recently, he completed his first year as an assistant coach with the University of Manitoba Men's Basketball program. In 2013, Jon co-founded the MBA (Manitoba Basketball Academy), an academy which focuses on skill and conceptual development for boys from the ages of 15 to 21.

Jon led the John Taylor Junior Varsity Boys to a Provincial Championship in 2014 and was named the 2014 Male Junior Varsity Coach of the Year for his efforts.

In the summer of 2012, Jon was a volunteer coach with the 15U Male Provincial team. In 2011, he took over as the John Taylor Collegiate Junior Varsity Boys Head Coach.  He has also been involved with the Winnipeg Elites, Winnipeg Thunder, and Kirkfield West Community Club.

Jon's coaching achievements include being named the 2011 WMBA Bruce Russell Coach of the Year, JV Urban 2010-2011 Provincial Champion (Assistant Coach), and 14U Club Provincial Champion (Head Coach).

Jon is a NCCP Introduction to Competition Advanced trained coach.

__________________________________________________________

Alyssa Grant attended Oak Park high school from 2006-2009 where she was named team MVP two years in a row. In her grade 12 year she was named to the All-Manitoba team and also received the Carl Ridd Award for excellence in school, community and sport involvement. In her graduating year at Oak Park she was named Athlete of the Year and left to play for the University of Winnipeg Women’s Basketball team. Alyssa is has just completed her 5th and final year playing for the University of Winnipeg. Throughout her career she was been a leader on and off the floor and was a co-captain of the team for three of her five years.

In addition to playing, Alyssa has also been heavily involved in coaching. She is currently in her fifth year assistant coaching for the Oak Park Raiders varsity girls’ basketball team. In that time the Raiders have made appearances at four consecutive provincial championships, capturing the title in 2013. Alyssa has also coach summer camps for both the University of Winnipeg and Basketball Manitoba’s High Performance Camps. While at university Alyssa has also volunteered her time coaching with the Inner-City Jr. Wesmen, ‘I Can Score’, and Athlete Initiative programs.

Alyssa is currently working towards her Bachelor of Education with a major in kinesiology and minor in psychology.  She is hoping to one day teach Physical Education/Health Education at the high school level. Alyssa is also an MFC certified personal trainer and hopes to continue coaching and training this summer and into her career as an educator.
__________________________________________________________


Samantha Pyke attended Byrne Creek Secondary School in her hometown of Burnaby, British Columbia from 2005-2010. She played for the school team as well as a variety of club teams which took her around the province, throughout the states and even to Japan.  She moved out to Winnipeg after graduating high school and has been a member of the University of Manitoba Women’s Basketball Team since then. This year she is heading into her fifth and final year in the CIS.

Coaching has always been a passion of Samantha’s. She was introduced to it in grade 11, getting involved with the younger grades and with camps around the city, and was happy to continue on in her first year of university. Since then she has been coaching with Junior Bison and BCB Club teams, as well as at many different boys and girls camps across Winnipeg and rural Manitoba, with participants’ ages ranging from 5 – 17 years old. Samantha also works with the SWISH (Summer Weekend Inner-city Supervised Hoops) program during the summer months.







TRYOUTS THIS SUNDAY AUG 24 & SEPT 7: Expanded Female Centre forPerformance Program Set for Fall for Females Born 2000-2002



Basketball Manitoba is pleased to announce it will be offering new expanded programming for females in its Centre for Performance program this coming season.  The one-year pilot project will now extend the training season for the Center for Performance to add tournament and exhibition play to allow the athletes to develop against elite level competition.  The Centre For Performance teams will play in select tournaments and exhibition play in Canada and the United States during the fall and spring seasons.  A pause in regular programming for the school basketball season will allow athletes to fully commit to their school programs.

INFORMATION ON MALE PROGRAM

The program will include support from Canada Basketball and the Women’s National team program in the form of curriculum and special training sessions led by National Team coaches.  Regular speed and strength training will be provided by McDole's Gym and the Strength and Conditioning department of the Sport for Life Center.  Athletes will also participate in special training sessions with guest coaches and instructors over the course of the program.


The Program will see a group of females born 2000, 2001, or 2002 train approximately three to four times per week from September to early December and from late March to late May.  The focus of the program is to develop fundamental skills, athletic ability, universal concepts, and the Canadian Women’s National team style of play.  Approximately 18 girls will be selected to the group for training.  The group will divide into two teams for tournament play to allow for quality playing time during games. 

The training group will be led by Basketball Manitoba High Performance Coach Randy Kusano and 15U Provincial Team Coach Alyssa Grant.

A player identification camp for the program will take place Sunday, August 24 at the University of Winnipeg from 1:00pm to 3:00pm.  The second phase of the identification camp will take place Sunday, September 7 at the University of Winnipeg from 1:00pm to 3:00pm.  A $25 tryout fee will be collected at the first session.  Athletes selected to the program will start training early September.

The total program fee will be $750.00 per player and will include...
  • twice weekly regular on-court training sessions during fall and spring seasons
  • weekly dedicated shooting practices from September to May
  • weekly strength and conditioning training sessions from September to May
  • Sport Science sessions 
  • Special guest coach sessions
  • All tournament entry fees
  • Russell Athletics Gear Package 
  • Full accident and liability insurance coverage



Tryout Notes
  • $25.00 tryout fee (cash or cheque payable to Basketball Manitoba) due at the first tryout.
  • All players are to complete the proper tryout form - CP Tryout Form (PDF) either in advance or on-site at the first session.
  • Show up at least 20 minutes before the first session to register.
  • No preregistration required
  • Basketballs will be provided at all sessions.
  • Players are to come dressed ready to play! 
  • Athletes are expected to be ready to attend both try-out dates as selections and cuts will be made after the first try-out and continue on to the second try-out.

__________________________________________________

COACH BIOGRAPHIES


Randy Kusano

Randy Kusano was the winningest coach in the history of high school basketball in Manitoba. His high school teams won three MHSAA (Manitoba High School Athletic Association) AAAA Provincial Championships provincial titles, 11 conference titles and he coached in 15 AAAA Final Fours in his 34 years coaching with the Oak Park Raiders in Winnipeg before retiring from teaching in 2010. A University of Manitoba graduate, Kusano is a current fully certified NCCP Level 3 coach with nearly 25 years of CIS coaching experience as an assistant with the Bison men’s and women's basketball program.

Randy has been involved in basketball as a player and coach for over forty years. He developed his love for basketball at Norberry Junior High in St. Vital playing for Hall of Famer, Dennis Alvestad. He moved on to Glenlawn Collegiate and finally to the University of Manitoba.  Randy was a member of three consecutive Canadian Junior Men’s championship teams from 1971-1973. In 1976 he was a member of the first Manitoba team to win a National University championship in basketball, the University of Manitoba Bisons.

After his university years were done he continued playing with the Nicolett Inn Senior men’s team that captured their first National Senior Men’s Championship in 1979. The University of Manitoba Junior Men and Nicolett Inn Senior men’s teams were later inducted into the Manitoba Basketball Hall of Fame.

Randy’s coaching career began with the University of Manitoba Junior Bisons in 1974 and continued there until 1976. He has coached high school basketball for the past thirty-four years, thirty two as head coach of the Varsity Boys program at Oak Park High School.

Over his 34 years at Oak Park, Randy developed the dominate high school program of it’s era, going to 15 Final Fours and winning 3 AAAA Provincial Championships. During this time he has helped to develop more than twenty five players who have gone on to play at the Canadian College or CIS level. Randy has also served as an assistant coach at the University of Manitoba for fifteen years.

Randy has also coached numerous Manitoba Provincial teams as head coach and as an assistant coach at the Canada Games, Western Canada Games, and National Championships.




Alyssa Grant 

Alyssa Grant attended Oak Park high school from 2006-2009 where she was named team MVP two years in a row. In her grade 12 year she was named to the All-Manitoba team and also received the Carl Ridd Award for excellence in school, community and sport involvement. In her graduating year at Oak Park she was named Athlete of the Year and left to play for the University of Winnipeg Women’s Basketball team. Alyssa is has just completed her 5th and final year playing for the University of Winnipeg. Throughout her career she was been a leader on and off the floor and was a co-captain of the team for three of her five years.

In addition to playing, Alyssa has also been heavily involved in coaching. She is currently in her fifth year assistant coaching for the Oak Park Raiders varsity girls’ basketball team. In that time the Raiders have made appearances at four consecutive provincial championships, capturing the title in 2013. Alyssa has also coach summer camps for both the University of Winnipeg and Basketball Manitoba’s High Performance Camps. While at university Alyssa has also volunteered her time coaching with the Inner-City Jr. Wesmen, ‘I Can Score’, and Athlete Initiative programs.

Alyssa is currently working towards her Bachelor of Education with a major in kinesiology and minor in psychology.  She is hoping to one day teach Physical Education/Health Education at the high school level. Alyssa is also an MFC certified personal trainer and hopes to continue coaching and training this summer and into her career as an educator.




For more information, go to...


Centre for Performance Program

8 Tips for Playing College Basketball

By: Alan Stein

The main reason Drew Hanlen and I founded the D1 Experience Camp was to create a platform to share exactly what it takes to play college basketball.  At each camp we talk about college level concepts and players do college level drills. It’s for serious players.

After all, playing college basketball is like a giant game of Musical Chairs – there are a lot more people (aspiring high school age players) than there are chairs (spots on college rosters)!  We encourage players to find ways to separate themselves to increase their chances of getting a ‘chair.’ We challenge them to join the 1% Club (develop the positive habits that 99% of people don’t have).

The first step to playing college basketball is working on your craft. It’s being relentless in your development.  It’s about becoming the best player you are capable of. You do that by building your game like a pyramid, from the ground up… brick by brick. Playing college basketball is an outcome goal.  To get there, you need to focus on the process.

Both Drew and I fulfilled our dreams and had the opportunity to play college basketball. Drew was a standout player and had a tremendous career at Belmont University.  I rode the bench at Elon College (now Elon University). I’ll save my college basketball roller coaster for another blog!

Here is some advice for aspiring college basketball players:

READ FULL ARTICLE...

UPDATE: Manitoba Spartans Announce Club Tryouts for 17U Girls on Aug22-24

Manitoba-Spartans.pngThe Manitoba Spartans Basketball Club have announced their tryouts for their 2014-2015 17U (1998 and under) girls team.






Tryouts:

  • Friday, August 22nd, 2014: 6-8 pm *Please bring your own basketball and water bottle
  • Saturday August 23rd, 2014: 6-8 pm with your name on them.
  • Sunday August 24th, 2014: 2-5 pm
UPDATE:

There will be a make up tryout for those who cannot attend, or attend all of the tryouts, on Tuesday, August 26th at 5:30 PM at the Kirkfield Westwood outdoor courts. If you can't make the final session, contact one of the coaches.


Competitive, younger athletes are welcomed and encouraged to try out. If you wish to try out for the Spartans, and are unable to attend the tryouts, please contact the one of the coaches.

All three tryouts will take place at Valour Community Centre - Isaac Brock Site located at 715 Telfer Street North. The cost of the tryout for the three days is $30 dollars.

The Spartans Basketball Club’s mission is to foster athletic development by focusing on the fundamentals of basketball through team concepts, while playing at a competitive level.

Athletes will:
  1. Practice 2-3 times a week from September 2014 – June 2015 (not conflicting with the MHSAA season)
  2. Participate in the Rising Stars League for the fall and winter seasons
  3. Take part in 3-4 tournaments (not conflicting with the MHSAA season), including travelling tournaments, which will be announced at a later date
  4. Host a home tournament
  5. Have the opportunity to learn from guest coaches
  6. Learn how to break down shot and game film

CLUB REGISTRATION FORM

For more information on the Spartans 17U Girls team please contact:

Victoria Zuke
Head Coach
204-999-4796
umzuke@cc.umanitoba.ca

Jeff Butler
Assistant Coach
204-229-9131
jeffb@r4software.com

Ashley Allan
Assistant Coach
204-804-8003
aallan@sjsd.net

We look forward to seeing all athletes at tryouts!



Manitoba Athletic Therapists Association Offering Sport First Aid Courses

The MATA has announced that it is offering a variety of Sport First Aid Courses this fall, these courses are accredited by Coaching Manitoba for Professional Development Credits and are a great resource for all coaches to have. Read on for Course Descriptions and dates, registration can be done online by clicking the link below. All courses are $25 and will be held at Sport Manitoba 145 Pacific Ave in Winnipeg.




Course Descriptions


Injury Prevention and Management - October 21, 2014 6:00pm - 9:00pm 
This course will introduce participants to a variety of injuries commonly associated with sports. It offers a great way for coaches to understand the basics of injuries and be well equipped to help an athlete at the time of injury. Topics will include techniques to help prevent injuries (warm-up, cool down, proper equipment), injury classification (sprain, strain, contusion), as well as the immediate care of injuries.

Taping 1 - September 28, 2014 9:00am - 2:00pm
Taping 1 is an excellent course for a coach or team manager. The course will equip them with the necessary basic skills to deal with an injured athlete. This course will focus on general taping skills and considerations, such as when to tape and when not to tape. The course includes a practical component focusing on basic taping skills as well as taping techniques for the ankle, wrist, and thumb.

Concussion 101 - October 7, 2014 6:00pm - 9:00pm 
This course will introduce concussion basics to coaches in order to help them better understand the following topics: What is a concussion? How is the brain affected following a concussion? Statistics and Facts regarding rates of concussion. As well as a practical session this will include an introduction to the SCAT 3 concussion testing protocol and a basic introduction to cranial nerves. 


https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1gpCovCqXzNKivAM5vZM54gFU6JL8l-dMWFt3_W8A7EE/viewform?usp=send_form

THIS WEEKEND: Junior Bison Boys Basketball Club Announce Program Tryouts for Ages 10-18 on Aug 23-24 at IGAC

The Junior Bison Boys Basketball Club have announced details on their upcoming tryouts for their programs on August 23 and 24 at the Investors Group Athletic Centre, 75 Sidney Smith Street in Winnipeg.  Full information is...

A Parental Primer in Youth Basketball

By: Nicholas Boon

Parental involvement has become a hot topic in youth sports thanks to a spike in research on the social environment of modern youth athletes. A 2002 article by Sean Cumming and Martha Ewing of Michigan State University does an exceptional job of compiling findings from the field, breaking down the multiple aspects of parental involvement. The entire article can be found here:

http://sirc.ca/online_resources/free_newsletter_articles/s-869103.cfm

This post will highlight key findings, expand on relevant theories, and provide some additional resources for parents and coaches on effective practices for parents of youth athletes.


Parental Involvement in Sports

“Parents are becoming increasingly involved in the lives of young athletes”, which is great when taken at face value; all sport parents should be engaged to at least a moderate degree. The best thing a parent can do is find out what their child wants to get out of sports, what they like or dislike, and what their sport goals might be. Not only does this communicate interest, but it allows parents to effectively support their child in pursuit of those goals.

It is also encouraged for parents of athletes to engage in physical activity for themselves, as this is a “positive predictor of enjoyment, participation in physical activity, and continued participation in youth sports” for their children. By playing with their children, parents are able to enhance their relationships as well as immerse themselves in the sporting experience.

Parental involvement typically includes emotional, financial and provisional support.

Financial & Provisional Support

While this may seem obvious, it is beneficial to think about this in some depth. Financial and provisional support usually comes in the form of time and money. Unfortunately, stressing over time and/or money is all too familiar for most parents.

Families investing so much in a child’s athletic pursuits may result in feelings of guilt. Children may feel pressured to continue participation if parents “use guilt as a motivating factor” or if athletes “feel guilty about the consequences of their involvement in sport”. In contrast, some athletes may feel that they should not, or cannot, continue with sport if they feel their participation negatively impacts their family.

Sport needs to be a source of enjoyment, not anxiety, for young children. Parents should provide financial and provisional support without their child feeling responsible for any undue stress the family may experience as a result.

Emotional Support

This is a more significant and complex role for sports parents. Sport is a powerful teaching tool for young children, and it is important for parents to engage in that learning process. Emotional support can include “helping the child deal with winning and losing, discussing tactics, providing verbal encouragement, and helping the child understand the lessons that sport can teach”.

Issues arise when parents become overly invested in the athletic experience of their child. It is important to note that over-emotional parents often have the best of intentions and want nothing more than to see their child succeed. There are two main categories of parents who are too emotionally involved: the excitable parent, and the fanatical parent.

Over-Emotional Parents

Excitable parents are typically supportive and positive, though they “tend to get caught up in the heat of the moment”. These parents often embarrass a child by loudly yelling encouragement or overreacting to any cut or bruise their child may receive. While there may not be any negative intent, children may find this behavior distracting, even resorting to asking their parents not to come to games or practices.

Fanatical parents pose “the greatest risk to the long-term development of young athletes”. These parents put considerable pressure on their child and emphasize performance and results more than development and enjoyment. It is not uncommon for fanatical parents to live vicariously through their child, associating their child’s athletic successes and failures as reflections of themselves.

Interestingly, while most children list enjoyment of the sport, spending time with friends, and learning new skills, fanatical parents often believe that their child participates “to win medals and trophies, gain social status and recognition, or become a professional”. Their children often “argue more frequently with coaches and officials, experience more problems with eating and sleeping, show less effort and enjoyment during training sessions, and are more likely to drop out of sports”.

Fortunately, these cases are more rare than not. Athletes typically believe their parents are positive and supportive, providing the valuable encouragement that all young athletes require. Children with these parents are most likely to continue their participation in athletics.

Encouraging Positive Involvement

The article also lists some valuable strategies for coaches and administrators to use to foster a positive environment for parents and children alike.

“Create an atmosphere that puts the interests of the child before winning” through your coaching priorities and personal behavior
Encourage parents to educate themselves in areas such as nutrition, concussion and injury management, and even the Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) model
Host “a parent orientation meeting” to inform parents about the program, your coaching philosophy, and their roles in their child’s experience
Finally, two incredibly valuable sites with articles, tools, and other resources for sport parents are included below:

http://changingthegameproject.com/for-parents/

http://www.momsteam.com/successful-parenting


Source: http://stevenashyb.wordpress.com/2014/08/06/snyb-original-a-parental-primer/

What Are Your 7 Core Coaching Values?

By: Joe Haefner

I believe that one of the best (maybe “the” best) way to make a positive impact on your basketball team and teach your players life lessons is to develop your own list of core values.

This is a list that you carry with you. Perhaps you post it in the locker room. But what ever you do with it, you should clearly emphasize these core values with your team.

It MUST be documented and well thought out.



I believe this is one of the best things you can do as a coach. Your message will get clearer. You’ll have a more profound impact on your players. They will respect you. They will play harder. And you will feel better about the impact you’re having on the team.

When John Wooden, the great coach at UCLA finished eighth grade, his father gave him a card entitled, 7 Suggestions to Follow.

They were:

  1. Be true to yourself.

  2. Help others.

  3. Make each day your masterpiece.

  4. Drink deeply from good books, especially the Good Book.

  5. Make friendship a fine art.

  6. Build a shelter for a rainy day.

  7. Pray for guidance and count and give thanks for your blessings each day.

Wooden kept a copy of the card in his pocket the rest of his life and used these philosophies in coaching.

So simple. Daily reinforcement of the basics can and will take you all the way to the top.

Let’s face it. You can’t teach your players all the hundreds of life lessons there are to teach. But if you FOCUS on a small set of core values every day in your practices and actions, you can have a tremendous positive effect on your players.

Consistency is vital. Focus is vital. Repetition is vital.

I believe all coaches should have their own list of documented and clearly emphasized core values.

I have my own list. All of the things in my list have a special meaning and make sense to me. I believe in them. They took me a long time to develop. You might want to spend a long time developing yours. You might want to put yours together quickly. Either way, just by having something you’ll be helping your players.

Here are mine:


  1. Teamwork / Help Others
    In a sport like basketball, teamwork is vital. It’s critical for us to work together and help each other. But this is more than just basketball. This applies to all aspects of your life (help someone else, and you help yourself). You should look to help others in your life, with nothing expected in return. Developing strong relationships, respecting others, and showing sincere care to everyone around you will take you a long way in life. This is something we will embrace as a team. We will constantly focus on the importance of teamwork and helping others…

    “You can’t live a perfect day without doing something for someone who will never be able to repay you.” – John Wooden.

  2. Positive Attitude
    We will strive to have a positive attitude in practice, games, and all aspects of our lives. Your attitude is what defines you. Your attitude affects you and the people around you. Your attitude affects your performance in games and practices. As a player, you should spend most of your time thinking about the positive things you are doing, versus dwelling on the negative ones (mistakes). You should also have a “proactive” attitude. This means that life is what YOU make of it. You choose happiness. You choose sadness. You choose decisiveness. You choose success. You choose failure. You choose courage. You choose fear. Just remember that every moment, every situation, provides a new choice. And in doing so, it gives you a perfect opportunity to do things differently to produce more positive results. Having a proactive attitude is about taking responsibility for your life. Proactive people don’t blame genetics, other people, circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. They know they choose their behavior. Reactive people, on the other hand, are often affected by their physical environment. They find external sources to blame for their behavior. We will strive to have a positive and proactive attitude in everything we do.

  3. Be Honest With Others and True to Yourself
    For us to succeed, we must have honesty and we must trust each other. This is one of the most important things you can do. Honesty applies to your life in countless ways and it can have different meanings. You must search for those meanings. For starters, an honest person is someone that can be trusted and relied upon. An honest person completes their agreements and promises — this could be as trivial as finishing a task on your “to do list”. Completing these agreements and tasks, removes clutter from your mind. An honest person is also someone that lives with integrity and character. Be reliable and someone that others can count on. Be responsible. Live with integrity and character. Be a good sport. Be true to yourself.

  4. Work Hard and Always Give Your Best Effort
    In basketball and life there are certain things you can NOT control. You can’t make every basket, you always can’t control who shoots, you can’t control if the ref blows the whistle. But there is one thing you can control 100% of the time — your effort. You have 100% control of your effort. You have a choice to go 50% on a basket cut, or go 100% on a basket cut. Because of that I expect you to ALWAYS give your best effort. There is no excuse you can give because you have control over it. You might miss a few baskets. You might turn the ball over. I can live with those mistakes as a coach. But what I can’t live with is anything less than 100% effort. There is no substitute for hard work. The hard work will eventually pay off.

  5. Perseverance
    As a team we will strive to show incredible perseverance and resiliency. We will play through mistakes. There will be bumps in the road, we will play through them. I believe it’s critical to always persevere — never give up and don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Anything is possible through hard work and perseverance.

    “Perseverance is the hard work you do after you get tired of doing the hard work you already did.” – Newt Gingrich

    “The true measure of a man is not how he behaves in moments of comfort and convenience but how he stands at times of controversy and challenges.” – MLK

    “The only real failure in life is one not learned from.” – Anthony J. D’Angelo

    “In order to succeed, you must first be willing to fail.”- Anonymous

    “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” – Albert Einstein

  6. Enjoy the Moment (have fun)
    We are going to work hard, but enjoy this process. Enjoy the improvement. Have fun with it. Looking back on my basketball playing days, those were some of the best times of my life. No I didn’t always play, start, or do well. Yes, it was hard work at times. But I loved it and learned from it. Focus on the things you are good at. Enjoy the process and focus your energy on the positive things (give thanks).

They might not mean much to you or make sense for that matter. But they have meaning and make sense to me. They help me remember what is important. I have plenty of quotes to back them up and lots of stories to make them impactful.

Borrow my core values if you’d like. Borrow someone else’s.

But take the time and determine what your core coaching values. 


Source: Steve Nash Youth Basketball Blog http://ift.tt/1Buc3Z8

9 Easy and Portable Pre-Game Snacks for Athletes

By: Sam DeHority

You know you won’t perform your best on an empty tank. But eat too much, too close to game time, and your pre-game meal may wind up on your shoes (or in a nearby trash can). Your best bet is to eat a pre-game snack about half an hour before you step onto the court or field to top off your energy stores, helping you power past opponents in the closing minutes.

A good pre-game snack will give you easily digested carbohydrates (simple sugars, not complex carbs or fiber), and perhaps a little protein and fat. Ideally, your snack will be portable and capable of staying good for hours inside a backpack or locker, since not every student-athlete has access to a refrigerator.

STACK connected with dietitians who work with the Houston Texans, New Orleans Pelicans, New Orleans Saints, Boston Cannons—and others—for their suggestions on simple pre-game snacks that meet those requirements.

1. Peanut Butter and Honey Sandwiches

It’s a simple twist on a modern favorite that will stay fresh in your bag all day long. “I’m a big fan of peanut butter and honey sandwiches on whole grain bread,” says Tavis Piattoly, MS, RD, who works with the New Orleans Saints and New Orleans Pelicans. “The combination of healthy fat and protein, along with the fiber from the whole grain bread, provides the athlete with the optimal combination of nutrients to keep [him or her] fueled for a longer workout. Athletes are usually coming off a three- to five-hour fast right before practice and will need calories to get through a longer practice.”

2. Homemade Trail Mix

Nuts, like almonds, peanuts and cashews, provide protein and healthy fats. Mix them with a source of simple carbs, like dried fruit, granola or even bits of pretzels, and you’ve got the ideal combo. “The athlete has the opportunity to be creative here by mixing and matching their favorite ingredients,” says Piattoly. “I usually recommend a combination of almonds, cashews, pumpkin seeds and walnuts (good fat and protein), mixed with dried cranberries and raisins along with fresh granola.” Piattoly’s other suggested ingredients include dark chocolate, cocoa nibs, whole grain cereal, peanut butter chips, chocolate chips, sunflower seeds and light popcorn.

3. Sports Nutrition Bar

Sports nutrition bars are great because they take the thinking and the prep time out of the equation and give you a portable, non-spoiling meal specifically designed to fuel you for sport. The only drawbacks? They can be expensive, and some have tastes or textures that are less-than-awesome. But with dozens of brands and flavors to choose from, you can experiment and find what works best for you. “Traditional sports bars meet the nutritional need that athletes have before practice,” says Roberta Anding, MS, RD, who works with the Houston Texans.

4. Piece of Fruit with Beef Jerky

Jerky is high in protein and sodium, which can keep you from cramping if you’re sweating buckets, and the fruit will be rich in carbs, the fuel that powers you through workouts. “A banana is great,” says Erica Giovinazzo, MS, RD, who coaches at CrossFit Brick in New York City. “Take an orange, apple [or a] cup of grapes and a bag of jerky with you for that carb and protein mix.”

5. Coconut Water and Protein Powder

Toss a bottle of coconut water and a zip-lock baggie with a scoop or two of your favorite protein powder in your gym bag before you leave for school, then down it an hour before practice starts. “This is a great go-to for pre-workout because it’s easily digested and increases your hydration,” Giovinazzo says. “Coconut water is also high in potassium, which is important for muscle contractions.”

6. Sports Drinks

Since they don’t take long to digest, sports drinks will be in and out of your stomach faster than the solid foods on this list.

7. Pretzels

Another easily packed snack, pretzels are high in carbohydrates as well as sodium, which you lose through sweat. If you’re too low on sodium, you’re more likely to cramp.

8. Energy Chews

Gatorade and CLIF both make gummy-bear-like products loaded with simple carbs that can be broken down quickly to provide energy for your muscles. The Gatorade chews are high in vitamin B6, which helps convert carbs into energy.

9. Fruit

Fruit appears on this list quite a few times with other foods, but Nicoletti says you can chomp down on fruit by itself when you’re prepping for a workout. “If an athlete is heading right out to the field with little time between classes and practice or a game, I recommend a high carbohydrate snack with little or no fiber or fat,” she says. “The purpose is only to top off physical energy and to fuel the brain for mental focus.“ Some great options include:

  • Bananas. They’re high in potassium, which can help prevent cramping. Just don’t squash it with your math book.
  • Apples. A small apple is high in sugar and packs a moderate amount of fiber—enough to make you feel satiated but not heavy.
  • Melon/Cantaloupe Slices. If you can slice up a melon after class, the tougher skin will fare better in your knapsack than more delicate fruits.
  • Grapes. Toss a handful in a sandwich baggy and pop them in your mouth until you’re comfortably full on your way to practice. Like the other fruits on this list, grapes are high in simple sugars that’ll give you a jolt off the line when your practice or game starts.


Source: http://stevenashyb.wordpress.com/2014/08/01/9-easy-and-portable-pre-game-snacks-for-athletes/

Wanted: Team Managers Bison Men’s Basketball



University of Manitoba Bison Men’s Basketball is looking for team managers for the 2014-15 season.  This experience will bring you inside the day to day workings of a CIS basketball program, help to build your skills and resume while networking with people in the basketball community. This is an ideal position for young person aspiring to be a coach or sport administrator.

Successful candidates will have some of the following characteristics:

·      U of M students preferred
·      Aspirations in coaching or sports management
·      Hard working, and reliable
·      Able to work both independently and in a team atmosphere.
·      Basketball/sports enthusiast

Managers will be responsible for helping organize and administer practice and training sessions as well as have a valuable role during home games. Managers may also travel to some away games with the team. Team managers will work under both the Head Coach and the Director of basketball operations assisting the program in many ways through out the season.

Interested people should contact: Kirby.Schepp@umanitoba.ca

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